"Digital Nomad" Reader Submissions|Themes and Methods for Submission Revealed at Once

Are you on the digital nomad journey? Are you trying freelancing, remote work, or entrepreneurship? We sincerely invite you to share your experiences and stories to everyone! I. Submission Themes Feel free to share under themes such as digital nomadism, remote work, freelancing, entrepreneurship, personal branding, media management, overseas work, etc.: 1. Your Work Experience and Skills E.g., freelancing techniques, personal branding strategies, overseas job hunting experiences, etc. 2. Introducing Various Digital Tools Beneficial for Work and Life E.g., effective digital tools for managing remote teams. 3. Methods for Improving Work Efficiency and Time Management E.g., overcoming procrastination, enhancing efficiency in online meetings, etc. 4. Essential Knowledge on Work Visas, Payments, Cross-Border Financial Flow, Contract Signing, etc. 5. Sharing Experiences of Living in Different Places and Local Customs E.g., sharing information about local prices, culture, safety, etc. For more themes and content, please refer to the articles on the Digital Nomad official website. II. Submission Format Please send your submissions to digitalnomad@ftpm.com.tw, with the email subject titled "Digital Nomad Reader Submission: Please Fill in Article Title," and provide "Self-Introduction" and "Submission Article." 1. Self-Introduction To help us understand you better, please provide a self-introduction of about 150 words. 2. Submission Article Word Count: 1000 words. Language: Chinese or English are both acceptable. Submission File: Please provide a Google.doc cloud link with editing permissions enabled. Image Format: If you wish to provide images, please attach them to the email in .jpg format, along with captions and image sources. If there are copyright concerns regarding the images you provide, we will not use them. Contact Information: You can include your blog or social media links at the end of the article. We will create hyperlinks so that readers can get to know you better through these links. Reader submissions are unpaid, and the Digital Nomad editorial team reserves the right to decide whether to publish them. Titles may be adjusted, and content may be edited, with your consent, before publication. Due to the high volume of submissions, we will reply to your email within two weeks. Digital Nomad hopes to be a platform for digital nomads to exchange ideas. Your articles will be featured in Digital Nomad, and we will also promote them through Facebook and Instagram to help you gain visibility and explore more collaboration opportunities. The Digital Nomad team also hopes to use this opportunity to collaborate more deeply with outstanding creators in various aspects. Welcome to submit and share your journey on the digital nomad path. We look forward to the opportunity to exchange and learn together.

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"Digital Nomad" Reader Submissions|Themes and Methods for Submission Revealed at Once

"Digital Nomad" Reader Submissions|Themes and Methods for Submission Revealed at Once

Are you on the digital nomad journey? Are you trying freelancing, remote work, or entrepreneurship? We sincerely invite you to share your experiences and stories to everyone! I. Submission Themes Feel free to share under themes such as digital nomadism, remote work, freelancing, entrepreneurship, personal branding, media management, overseas work, etc.: 1. Your Work Experience and Skills E.g., freelancing techniques, personal branding strategies, overseas job hunting experiences, etc. 2. Introducing Various Digital Tools Beneficial for Work and Life E.g., effective digital tools for managing remote teams. 3. Methods for Improving Work Efficiency and Time Management E.g., overcoming procrastination, enhancing efficiency in online meetings, etc. 4. Essential Knowledge on Work Visas, Payments, Cross-Border Financial Flow, Contract Signing, etc. 5. Sharing Experiences of Living in Different Places and Local Customs E.g., sharing information about local prices, culture, safety, etc. For more themes and content, please refer to the articles on the Digital Nomad official website. II. Submission Format Please send your submissions to digitalnomad@ftpm.com.tw, with the email subject titled "Digital Nomad Reader Submission: Please Fill in Article Title," and provide "Self-Introduction" and "Submission Article." 1. Self-Introduction To help us understand you better, please provide a self-introduction of about 150 words. 2. Submission Article Word Count: 1000 words. Language: Chinese or English are both acceptable. Submission File: Please provide a Google.doc cloud link with editing permissions enabled. Image Format: If you wish to provide images, please attach them to the email in .jpg format, along with captions and image sources. If there are copyright concerns regarding the images you provide, we will not use them. Contact Information: You can include your blog or social media links at the end of the article. We will create hyperlinks so that readers can get to know you better through these links. Reader submissions are unpaid, and the Digital Nomad editorial team reserves the right to decide whether to publish them. Titles may be adjusted, and content may be edited, with your consent, before publication. Due to the high volume of submissions, we will reply to your email within two weeks. Digital Nomad hopes to be a platform for digital nomads to exchange ideas. Your articles will be featured in Digital Nomad, and we will also promote them through Facebook and Instagram to help you gain visibility and explore more collaboration opportunities. The Digital Nomad team also hopes to use this opportunity to collaborate more deeply with outstanding creators in various aspects. Welcome to submit and share your journey on the digital nomad path. We look forward to the opportunity to exchange and learn together.

April 12, 2024

Podcast "Digital Nomad" | “Lifehacker" Raymond: Improve Work Efficiency by Experimenting on Yourself First!

Podcast "Digital Nomad" | “Lifehacker" Raymond: Improve Work Efficiency by Experimenting on Yourself First!

Do you ever feel like life is overwhelming, with a mountain of tasks piling up, never enough time, and constantly forgetting things? Do you also find that the software tools available on the market aren't useful, or you're unsure how to make the best use of them? Raymond, founder of the self-media brand "雷蒙三十 Lifehacker", may be the most systematic, organized, and even "technological" digital nomad I've ever encountered. For instance, he uses Notion, ChatGPT, or various computer software to enhance his work efficiency and manage effectively. He has a variety of smart devices on his computer desk and at home to optimize his life. He truly integrates the word "digital" into his lifestyle. In fact, if you ask Raymond casually about his expenses for the whole year of 2016 or which project had the highest expenditure, or where certain collaboration data from five years ago is stored, he can immediately find the answers amidst a vast amount of data just by opening his computer. Reflecting on the past, Raymond started freelancing as a student in university to earn tuition and living expenses. Despite being a student during the day with 10 hours filled with exams and classes, he began to "systemize" his work and life due to limited time and numerous tasks. Three years ago, Raymond founded the self-media brand "雷蒙三十 Lifehacker" to share various methods of improving work efficiency, self-management, and unpacking digital tools, which gained much popularity among readers. His online course "Notion 線上訓練營 "(Notion Training Camp) even accumulated over ten thousand registrations. Raymond jokingly says his memory is very poor. His ability to manage his work and life systematically and efficiently lies in finding the "right" tools and methods that suit him best! Especially as a digital nomad, when you have a better grasp of your work and life, it's crucial to manage your life well. So, what are the best tools and methods for yourself? This article summarizes them for you! First, How to Be Effective? Try Experimenting! Many people aim to enhance their productivity and efficiency by learning from successful individuals, yet they find those methods ineffective. For instance, you might have seen media reports about Mark Zuckerberg or Steve Jobs, who are productive and efficient due to early rising. Consequently, you attempt to emulate their practices by trying to wake up early, only to find yourself unable to do so or feeling groggy, leading to even lower efficiency. Raymond emphasizes: "You don't have to follow mainstream methods; personalize your approach instead!" During college, Raymond heard about the notion that "early risers are more productive," but is it true? He decided to experiment and find out! For a month, he woke up at 7 a.m. every day, and for another month, he slept until 3 a.m. and woke up at 10 a.m., documenting his work mood, focus, and other factors daily. And then? He discovered that he was naturally a night owl, achieving better focus and productivity at night. "Early rising for productivity" didn't apply to him, and he found the most suitable working hours for himself. Raymond suggests, "To find the method that suits you best, experiment and keep records, rather than adhering to mainstream definitions of 'how things should be done' or methods used by successful individuals!" You can also refer to Raymond's articles about Lifehacker to gain a better understanding of how to establish a systematized life that suits you. Second, The Key to Choosing Tools Lies in "Goals" Many people use tools like iPads or various life management software to organize tasks, but they often give up midway or find them ineffective. How can you find the most suitable and effective tools for yourself? Raymond suggests starting with a blank sheet of paper and jotting down everything you do from waking up in the morning to going to bed at night. It could be a work flowchart or a mind map, nothing too complicated. Then, review your day. The key to choosing tools is to start from your needs and the goals you want to achieve. For example, if you enjoy reading articles online in the morning and often have many tabs open, wanting to manage your pages and data efficiently, you can use management tools or RSS to integrate information from different websites. "Identify what each work or life need is, and then find the corresponding tools. I believe this is the initial point of solving the problem!" says Raymond. Otherwise, when you have too many tools, you'll have to remember what Tool A is for, and what Tool B is for, leading to chaos in your life. "Your brain is meant for problem-solving, thinking, and creating, not for memorizing and storing information!" Raymond says. Trimming the fat, identifying your true needs, and using tools and methods that suit you can help you establish a more systematized life. If you're interested in Raymond's digital nomad journey and methods for systematic life management, feel free to listen to "JB's Small Talk" Digital Nomad SP1: Freelancers Need to Construct Personalized Systems for Long-term Balance Between Income and Freedom | Interview with "雷蒙三十 Lifehacker" Raymond. -- Follow the Digital Nomad Facebook fan page and stay updated with more recent articles on Instagram (@digital.nomad.press)!

March 21, 2024

BI Analyst Angel Chen Exclusive Interview | The Value of Digital Nomadism Lies in "Choosing" the Lifestyle You Want

BI Analyst Angel Chen Exclusive Interview | The Value of Digital Nomadism Lies in "Choosing" the Lifestyle You Want

"In my digital nomad journey, I've met many extraordinary people. For instance, when I was in Hainan, I had a friend from Beijing who only worked about half the year. During the winter, he did marketing at a ski resort, and the rest of the time, he surfed in Hainan." As I expressed my surprise, Angel on the other end of the video call continued, "Yes, I was also like, 'Wow, is that even possible?'" Currently working as a Business Intelligence Analyst in a Singaporean company, Angel has been a digital nomad for about two years. Passionate about surfing, she has lived not only in Yilan and Taitung but also in cities such as Hainan in China, Chiang Mai in Thailand, and Bali in Indonesia. A few weeks before the interview, she embarked on a long-awaited journey to Sri Lanka alone with her backpack. At the time of the interview, she had returned to her "nomadic hub" in Bali. Talking about her nomadic life, she smiled and mentioned that she always loved traveling. Therefore, even with a nine-to-five job with demanding responsibilities, she found immense joy in the nomadic lifestyle. However, as her travel experiences expanded and she met more people, she realized that her happiness didn't solely stem from traveling itself. Delving deeper, she discovered that digital nomadism created a larger space than before, enabling people to freely "choose" the kind of life they want. Don't Let "Nomadism" Limit You; Life Can Be Diverse When discussing "digital nomadism," many people often have a misconception that it means constantly moving from place to place. But according to Angel, we don't need to be restricted by terminologies. The proclaimed freedom of the nomadic lifestyle offers various possibilities. "Some people like frequent changes of location, finding it refreshing, while others, like me, prefer staying in one place for a longer period, maybe spending a few months deeply exploring a destination. Some people can travel, but they choose to stay in Taiwan and travel occasionally," she explained. For her, these are all valid options. Some might wonder if being a digital nomad means a decrease in income. After all, the conventional perception of "success" often involves working in modern, tidy offices rather than traveling around. However, Angel suggests otherwise. With the right career strategies during nomadic life, it's entirely plausible to maintain or even increase one's income compared to before. Understanding digital nomadism in this light, it's not difficult to comprehend: It doesn't signify one "ideal" way of living but rather prompts individuals to contemplate the kind of life they truly desire and make choices accordingly. Angel working remotely by the beach. (Photo from Angel) "Moreover, embarking on nomadic life has exposed me to various lifestyles, expanding my imagination about life," Angel added. She elaborated that after graduating from university, she worked in Shanghai. In the fast-paced metropolitan city, her perception of what life should be like was similar to that of most people—working in tech giants or internet companies, earning a substantial income, and climbing up the career ladder. However, after embracing the nomadic lifestyle, she met many new friends from different backgrounds and countries during her journeys. She mentioned a few examples: Friend A, who works only half the year, spending the winter working at a ski resort and the rest of the time surfing in Hainan; Friend B, who quit her job in the tourism industry to run a homestay in Taitung, Taiwan; and Friend C, who moved from Spain to Indonesia simply because they loved the lifestyle in Bali. "I used to believe there was only one way to live life, but now I realize there are numerous possibilities. Whether one focuses on their career or pursues their interests, as long as their income supports the life they desire, it's the most important and fulfilling choice," Angel concluded. Choices Always Come with "Costs"; Accept Reality and Find Solutions Although Angel has gained a lot during her nomadic journey, she also acknowledges that every choice comes with its own set of costs. For her, there are two significant costs she feels in her current lifestyle: 1.It's challenging to establish stable new relationships because she typically stays in one place for only a few months. 2.Due to spending long periods away from Taiwan, she naturally has less contact with her old friends. However, over the past two years, she has developed coping mechanisms for these challenges. Regarding building stable relationships, she gradually reduced engagement in social activities that she wasn't good at or fond of, such as parties where she had to chat with large groups of people at once. Instead, she focused on connecting with like-minded individuals through shared interests like surfing. This not only provided surfing companions but also fostered deeper interactions and friendships. She also shared a memorable experience from her nomadic journey: "Last year, I celebrated my 30th birthday in Bali. I went diving with a Spanish roommate who brought a slate underwater with 'Happy Birthday Angel' written on it. Looking back, I was really touched. I never expected to make such close friends during my solo nomadic journey, let alone celebrate my birthday in such a surprising way." The Spanish roommate surprises Angel with a "birthday message" underwater. (Photo from Angel) Angel (front right) poses with roommates from Russia, Germany, New Zealand, and Australia in Bali. (Photo from Angel) Regarding the second challenge—reduced contact with old friends—her approach is to make the most of opportunities to meet with friends when she returns to Taiwan. After all, as adults, everyone has their own lives, and actively inviting important friends to hang out is more practical than waiting for them to reach out. Making "Choices" Rationally: Consider 5 Self-Assessment Aspects + 6 Nomadic Destination Considerations After weighing the feasibility of your job conditions, if you have a nomadic plan similar to Angel's, she offers five aspects for further consideration: What kind of travel/lifestyle suits me: Do I prefer frequent movement? Staying in one city for a few months before moving? Or mostly staying in Taiwan and traveling occasionally? Am I capable of living independently: Can I handle everyday tasks (like laundry, cooking, etc.) by myself? How capable am I of traveling alone: Can I solve various problems during travel alone? Is my language Do I have the ability to be alone: Does being alone make me uncomfortable, or do I enjoy it? How can I make friends: Do I enjoy participating in social activities? Or how do I plan to make friends during my travels? It's important to note that the implications of these five aspects are not "I can't do it, so I can't be a nomad"; rather, they help evaluate the corresponding skill requirements based on the type of nomadic lifestyle one is suited for or desires. If you currently don't meet the requirements, how can you enhance or adjust your travel/lifestyle? If you're unsure about some aspects, such as solo travel experience, you can start with minimal endeavors (like short-term trips) to test the waters. In addition to pre-departure assessments and improvements, when it comes to choosing the first nomadic destination, Angel shares her approach: "I think the priority is to determine whether I'm interested in this city and if there are places I want to explore here." Then, she evaluates factors such as internet stability, cost of living, safety, and visa requirements (including application difficulty and duration of stay). You can find this information on nomadic websites like Nomad List, or you can search using keywords like "city" and "digital nomad." "Besides, time zone differences are also crucial," Angel added. Although she wishes to nomad in Europe, she considers her current job requiring frequent collaboration with colleagues in Singapore, which might be inconvenient in different time zones. Therefore, she temporarily keeps this wish in mind, waiting for a time when it can be realized in the future. Thinking about the future, Angel said, "Nomadic life has brought me immense happiness. I may not stay in my current job forever, but I will find ways to maintain this lifestyle that I love." For friends who have been contemplating nomadism but haven't taken action yet, she encourages with a bright smile, "Just do it! After all, the happiness I currently enjoy also comes from the 'choice' I made two years ago, mixed with caution and a little impulsiveness." If you're curious about Angel's digital nomad journey, you can also refer to "JB's Small Talk." -- Follow the Digital Nomad Facebook fan page and stay updated with more recent articles on Instagram (@digital.nomad.press)!

March 12, 2024

3 Special Experiences Brought by Freelancing|You Should Try It At Least Once in Your Lifetime!

3 Special Experiences Brought by Freelancing|You Should Try It At Least Once in Your Lifetime!

For many, the term "entrepreneurship" embodies dreams and passion. The startup stories of Apple, Google, and Tesla have become epics and legends of our time, akin to the clarion call of adventure, urging the brave to embark on risky ventures. However, among the millions of workers in Taiwan, only a minority ultimately choose entrepreneurship. For most of us, even after graduation, we opt to join companies to utilize our skills. However, today, I want to persuade you of one thing: even if entrepreneurship isn't your choice, I still recommend trying freelancing or earning some extra income outside your regular job, at least once. Because it will bring you many unique and interesting experiences, some of which could even pave the way for your future career. 1. Experience of Flying Solo There's a documentary about Air Force pilot training called "Taiwan's Elite Warriors :Fighter Pilot", which I highly recommend. Regardless of how many flights rookie pilots take under the guidance of instructors, they must ultimately pass the test of "solo flight" to become true pilots. Many professions are similar. For instance, a surgeon can only truly become a proficient doctor when they can operate independently. It's like when we were kids learning to ride bicycles; no matter how stable our rides were with training wheels, it wasn't until the day the adults removed them that we could proudly say, "I can ride a bike!" Similarly, even if you always accomplish your missions at work, have you ever wondered, if you didn't have a boss or supervisor guiding you, could you solve a problem from start to finish or produce an output? I suggest you frequently ponder this because more and more companies are particularly interested in whether job applicants have the ability to "work independently" or even "make independent decisions," which has almost become a standard interview question. Unless you never have to look for a job again in your life, you'll have to prove to others that even without an "instructor" or "training wheels," you can still independently create value. My first freelancing experience was being a lecturer for a company. At that time, I had experience giving lectures within the company to my colleagues. Later, a friend asked me to give lectures to the employees and the boss of a small company. I thought it wouldn't be a big deal, just revisiting my previous PowerPoint presentations, but after agreeing, I realized that when I used to give lectures within the company, everything from timing, location, venue equipment, attendees, notifications, and tracking results was arranged by supervisors and colleagues. The learners also knew each other well. Many "invisible" tasks and responsibilities were taken care of by others. It wasn't until this freelancing gig that I truly felt the thrill of "flying solo." Despite the immense pressure, I grew immensely. Nowadays, many companies require job seekers to have the ability to "work independently," especially for positions involving "remote work." If you have had several successful experiences of freelancing independently, it can definitely serve as a strong testament to your capabilities. 2. Experience of Market Value I remember my first freelancing gig as a lecturer, where I charged an hourly rate of NT$ 4,500. For someone under 30 years old with no professional teaching experience, this was quite high. After successfully completing the project, I realized: People are willing to pay NT$ 4,500 per hour for my time! I quickly compared this to my hourly "rate" at the company, which was only a little over NT$ 200.NT$ 4,500 compared to NT$ 200, a difference of 22.5 times - this stark contrast left me astonished! This led to a new realization. I thought, if I have a market value of NT$ 4,500 per hour, why would I accept a company's hourly wage of just over NT$ 200? You might think, NT$ 4,500 per hour gigs aren't available every day, but the company's monthly salary is stable! But what's more important, I believe, is that by working at the company, I'm "earning less" byNT$ 4,300 per hour. So, I must "earn it back" from elsewhere; otherwise, working in the company would be too costly! How do you "earn back the difference"? Certainly not by stealing office supplies or tea bags! It's by diligently learning skills, accumulating experience and contacts, obtaining these intangible yet valuable company resources, so that in the future, there's a better chance of selling yourself for NT$ 4,500 or even higher per hour. So, I would suggest trying freelancing independently to understand how much you're worth from the perspective of the market? This way, the next time you complain about low company salaries or aim for a higher pay, you'll have more confidence! And when you plan to switch jobs, you'll have a more precise understanding of your market value! 3. Experience in Business Operations Working in a company, especially in highly specialized roles in large corporations, often creates a sense of dependence. Because each of us only does our part, and there's often an SOP to follow, we can become mere cogs in a big machine, losing our ability to solve problems and be creative. If being a little screw all your life brings you happiness, that's fine. But in this era, where companies have shorter lifespans, and entire industries rapidly decline, if you're a young person under 40, you must think carefully about how to support yourself and your family in the future. Although Taiwan's legal retirement age is 65, in recent years, people in their early 50s have trouble finding jobs, and there are more and more "retirees." If these "old screws" have the ability to operate a small personal business independently, wouldn't that provide more career security? In recent years, I've seen many seniors around me who were high-ranking executives in companies, receiving retirement benefits, wanting to start small businesses (usually cafes or food stalls), but most of them failed. "I led hundreds of people in a listed company, expanded business globally, why would opening a small coffee shop be difficult for me?" However, "professionalism" and "entrepreneurship," though only differing by a word, are entirely different games. Being good at management is going from 1 to 100, while starting a business is going from 0 to 1. There are too many different know-hows and challenges between the two, being proficient in one doesn't guarantee an easy transition to the other. Therefore, for office workers within the stable framework of a company, if you can allocate some extra time to try "freelancing," experience the feeling of going from 0 to 1, face the market alone, and take on the new role of "principal and bell ringer," you'll be building strength for your career. Even if you face career risks in middle age, you'll have more chips to deal with it. Conclusion Most office workers, when they hear "freelancing," first think of "earning money," and if the money isn't much, they lose interest. But what I want to say is, even if you're not interested in earning extra income and have no intention of starting a business, just want to be a professional office worker, the rare experiences brought by freelancing, such as "flying solo," "market value," and "business operations," will help build excellent assets and moats for your career, making it worth trying when you have some free time! -- Follow the Digital Nomad Facebook fan page and stay updated with more recent articles on Instagram (@digital.nomad.press)!

February 27, 2024

Digital Nomad in Chiang Mai! 8 Recommended Shared Spaces

Digital Nomad in Chiang Mai! 8 Recommended Shared Spaces

Many novice digital nomads choose Chiang Mai as their first destination for remote work. Not only is the cost of living low and the city safe, but it also offers abundant leisure and entertainment options, making it a favorite among digital nomads. Read more:Capital of Digital Nomads! Why is Chiang Mai the Best Choice for Remote Workers? Therefore, this article will recommend 8 places in Chiang Mai that are suitable for digital nomads to work and live. The Social Club The Social Club is a hotel located in Chiang Mai, offering complimentary WiFi, air-conditioned rooms, private parking, and room service. Digital nomads can utilize indoor and outdoor shared workspace, meeting rooms, and enjoy complimentary coffee and tea from 9 am to 9 pm. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 The Social Club - Coliving & Coworking Space(@thesocialclub.asia)分享的貼文 Punspace Punspace is located in the heart of Chiang Mai's old city, close to many cultural landmarks and eateries. It offers high-speed internet, comfortable desks and chairs, coffee machines, shower facilities, lockers, and other amenities, allowing you to focus on your work. Punspace also fosters a friendly community where you can network and collaborate with people from diverse fields. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Punspace(@punspace)分享的貼文 Yellow Co-Working Space Yellow Co-Working Space is a shared workspace focused on Web3 and blockchain, providing digital nomads and remote workers with communal and private office spaces, meeting rooms, event areas, soundproof Skype rooms, YouTube media rooms, and other modern amenities, entertainment zones, and collaborative facilities. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Yellow Coworking(@yellowcoworking)分享的貼文 Alt_ChiangMai It's a shared space that combines accommodation with workspaces conveniently located downstairs. The venue is clean yet not overcrowded, making it easy to meet many digital nomads here. Regular activities such as yoga, ice baths, and travel excursions are organized, facilitating interaction and learning with people from different countries and fields. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Alt_ChiangMai(@alt_chiangmai)分享的貼文 Akha Ama Phrasingh It's a café located in the old city of Chiang Mai. While it's not a shared workspace per se, many digital nomads still come here to work because of the free charging and WiFi. With two seating areas spread across two floors, it's suitable for both work and leisure. In addition to coffee, they offer various desserts and tea, providing you with a cool sanctuary amidst the heat of Chiang Mai. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Akha Ama Coffee Roasters(@akhaamacoffee)分享的貼文 Life Space Located in the heart of Chiang Mai, this place offers convenient transportation. There are spacious and bright work areas, quiet reading rooms, fast and stable internet, complimentary coffee and tea, comfortable sofas and hammocks, as well as a small garden. You can enjoy the freedom and flexibility of working here. Additionally, they provide multi-person meeting rooms, with regular meeting rooms accommodating up to 4 people and a training room accommodating more than 10 people. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Life Space(@lifespaceth)分享的貼文 One Workspace One Workspace offers digital nomads shared workspaces, meeting rooms, event spaces, and virtual offices. There's also a café called Tora Bake, serving delicious coffee and pastries, allowing you to relax during breaks from work. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 OneWorkspace_Chiangmai(@oneworkspace2021)分享的貼文 Hub53 Although Hub53 is located further away from the old city, it offers affordable prices and amenities such as a shared kitchen and laundry room. The shared space has everything you need, and there are user-exclusive groups where you can organize outings and activities. 在 Instagram 查看這則貼文 Hub53 Coworking & Coliving(@hub53coworking)分享的貼文 -- Follow the Digital Nomad Facebook fan page and stay updated with more recent articles on Instagram (@digital.nomad.press)!

February 23, 2024

Capital of Digital Nomads! Why is Chiang Mai the Best Choice for Remote Workers?

Capital of Digital Nomads! Why is Chiang Mai the Best Choice for Remote Workers?

Stepping into a café in Chiang Mai, you'll find it bustling with remote workers from all over the world. They order a cup of coffee, open their laptops, and begin remote work. Chiang Mai is often hailed as the 'Capital of Digital Nomads,' the premier destination for remote workers and freelancers worldwide. In numerous surveys conducted by media outlets and organizations, Chiang Mai consistently ranks among the top cities favored by digital nomads. Many newcomers to the digital nomad lifestyle choose Chiang Mai as their first stop, and even seasoned digital nomads find themselves drawn back to this city time and again. But why is Chiang Mai so popular? Here are five key reasons that explain why! 1. Low Cost of Living Living in Chiang Mai comes with a remarkably low cost of living. According to statistics from Nomad List , the overall monthly living expenses in Chiang Mai are approximately $980 USD. When it comes to accommodation, you can typically find high-value hotels ranging from $7 to 15 USD per day. Apart from hostels, there are also co-living spaces, short-term apartments, and even upscale condominiums with amenities like swimming pools and gyms available for $320 to 650 USD per month, offering a comfortable living experience. For more detailed pricing information, you can refer to NUMBEO. 2. Safety Chiang Mai boasts excellent safety ratings. In the NUMBEO "Safety Index by City 2024" survey of 333 cities worldwide, Chiang Mai ranked 22, surpassing Singapore at 23 and Tokyo at 25. 3. Abundant Leisure and Entertainment Options Apart from its rich natural and historical attractions, Chiang Mai offers a vibrant nightlife scene. In addition to night markets, numerous bars attract travelers and digital nomads from around the world to socialize and enjoy drinks. Furthermore, many digital nomads organize activities such as sightseeing, jogging, rock climbing, and even boxing, providing ample opportunities for networking and sharing experiences. In Chiang Mai, there's never a shortage of things to do after work! 4. Excellent Working Environment Often dubbed the "Capital of Digital Nomads," Chiang Mai boasts a friendly environment for remote workers, with both reliable internet connections and conducive workspaces. Many cafes offer stable Wi-Fi and power outlets, while numerous coworking spaces, some of which are open 24 hours, cater specifically to digital nomads. Additionally, many accommodations provide dedicated office spaces and meeting rooms for digital nomads, ensuring that finding a place to work is never a concern. 5. Digital Nomad Networking Chiang Mai attracts digital nomads from around the globe, providing ample opportunities to meet and connect with individuals from different countries. Here, you can exchange experiences, seek advice on unfamiliar topics, and build friendships with fellow digital nomads. There are also various digital nomad communities and groups on social media platforms dedicated to Chiang Mai, offering insights into local life and facilitating networking opportunities. Whether you're a novice or seasoned digital nomad, a visit to Chiang Mai, Thailand, is definitely worthwhile! -- Follow the Digital Nomad Facebook fan page and stay updated with more recent articles on Instagram (@digital.nomad.press)!

February 22, 2024